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August 10, 2018
As women continue to play a critical role in conservation in Africa, one group of community-appointed wildlife ambassadors in Northern Kenya are doing their bit to help save the world’s largest land mammals, the elephant.  The Mama Tembos - a group of nine women from Samburu and Turkana are working with Save The Elephants and the Kalama community conservancy to guard wildlife and livestock corridors in Northern Kenya.  Not only is their work having a positive impact on the future ...

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June 18, 2018
You shop and Amazon donates at no cost to you.   Save The Elephants has partnered with Amazon and is now eligible to receive donations generated by Smile.Amazon.co.uk shoppers! Amazon Smile is a program that donates 0.5% of your eligible purchase to a charity of your choice. It’s a simple, automatic way for you to continue supporting your favourite charity from anywhere in the world! By making this seamless switch to AmazonSmile, you’ll be doing your bit ...

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May 28, 2018
It “Musth” Be Love
Monica Sandri, International Intern


The Long-term Monitoring Team here at Save the Elephants has been observing a lot of breeding behavior in Samburu over the past few weeks. Dozens of large males have come into what we call “musth,” a state in which a male elephant’s body and behavior changes and functions to increase sexual activity. But what exactly is musth, and how does one distinguish a musth male versus a non-musth male? Like many other mammals, cycles in reproduction involve change in...

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May 18, 2018
The team at Save the Elephants’ research centre in northern Kenya got the surprise of their life when a lost baby elephant walked into the middle of their camp recently. The team are used to monitoring and occasionally rescuing wild elephants in the field but this was the first time an elephant had ever approached them for help! The 300kg baby’s unannounced visit came just thirty minutes after a nearby tourist facility, Samburu Lodge, reported seeing a...

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May 16, 2018
Our Samburu team were given an unusual challenge recently when they went in search of a camera-shy collared bull elephant named Tony in Northern Kenya.  For the past two years, we’ve been trying to get new photos of Tony for our elephant ID database, but he’s evaded our efforts every time. Our long term monitoring research requires individual photographs of each elephant that enters Samburu National Reserve. Individual elephants can be identified by differences in their tusks and...

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May 14, 2018
Experiencing the Jumbo moment...
Monica Sandri, International Intern


There is nothing quite like seeing wild elephants for the first time. No matter where you come from or what age you are, elephants can inspire people from all walks of life. For myself, I had never seen a wild elephant before this week and was eager to spot one on my first day in Samburu as the new Save the Elephants intern. Clinging to the interior of a bouncing Landcruiser, I peered hard over the landscape, hoping to spot flapping ears and busy trunks. It’s ...

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May 9, 2018
Nurturing Conservation Leaders in Northern Kenya
By Consolata Kithinji, Education Officer


As Save The Elephants works towards building a tolerant relationship between man and elephants, our Elephant Scholarship Programme is furthering this mission by providing students with an opportunity to change their lives. Since its inception almost 18 years ago, the programme has grown from strength to strength and recently celebrated its highest number of scholars (16) for its 2018 intake. Educating bright children living on the fringes of ...

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April 27, 2018
Rainy Season in Samburu
Lynn Kanga, National Intern


‘Wow! Samburu is so green!’ I remember thinking on the morning after my arrival at the Save the Elephants research camp found inside Samburu National Reserve. ‘You are lucky to be here at this time. It’s a paradise’, said Davido, the assistant researcher for Long Term Monitoring as we went on my very first LTM adventure. I couldn’t agree more.  A normally dry and dusty Samburu is now green and lush. Plants and animals in the reserve are now flourishing. You see, this is Kenya’s...

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April 25, 2018
From France to Samburu: How one young student got to meet her donor
Consolata Kithinji, Conservation Education Officer


As Save The Elephants works towards building a tolerant relationship between man and elephants, the STE/Elephant Watch Safaris Elephant Scholarship Programme is furthering this mission by providing students with an opportunity to change lives. In 2016, we admitted the fourteen year old who hails from Isiolo, Naima Mohamed into the programme after she had performed so well in her final primary school examinations. From the way ...

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April 24, 2018
Creating green islands in schools
Nancy Odweyo, Assistant Conservation Education Officer


Since its launch in 2016, the Save The Elephants Wildlife Clubs has grown from strength to strength. At present, we have more than 300 active members across 11 schools with a myriad of conservation activities achieved.  In tandem with our mobile lessons, these clubs continue to serve as ideal platforms to widen our reach and spread the conservation message to an even more diverse audience. In the wake of prolonged drought spells, erratic ...

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April 23, 2018
Elephant scholars show determination in the face of adversity
Consolata Kithinji, Conservation Education Officer


Getting to school can be a daily struggle for many young people in Kenya. Not only do they have to trek long distances, but many have to deal with a range of issues from wildlife conflict to coping with drought and hunger. (Save The Elephants does what it can to help elephant scholars cope with these obstacles including providing food to schools in need.) Despite the challenges, it’s encouraging to see so many students overcoming these challenges and emerging ...

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April 20, 2018
Samburu Baby Ellie Boom!
Lynn Kanga, National Intern


When I go out for Long Term Monitoring one thing I always looking forward to is seeing the baby elephants. They are mesmerizing to watch. They can seem even silly and clumsy at times-like how the very young calves, one or two months old, drink water. They submerge their entire head inside the water to drink with their mouth, raising the trunk above water to breathe. One would think that it’s all fun and games but it’s because they don’t know how to use their trunks to drink yet. I also ...

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April 20, 2018
Living with Wildlife
Nancy Odweyo, Assistant Conservation Education Officer


In January this year, our Field Education Officer, Daud Abdi made his maiden overseas voyage from Kenya after being invited to participate in a conservation and training programme in Namibia.    Daud, who is based in our research camp in the heart of Samburu, Northern Kenya, was among more than 200 wildlife managers, conservation policy leaders, and students and academics, to attend 2018 Pathways Africa in Windhoek. ...

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April 18, 2018
A dangerous crossing!
George Mugera, Education intern


The Samburu National reserve has received an incredible amount of  rainfall over the past few weeks. As a result the park is lush with green pastures which has been a great relief to elephants and other wildlife. The Ewaso Ny’iro River, which is the lifeline for both wildlife and the Samburu people, has been constantly overflowing, often breaking its banks, and the heavy currents have made it tricky...

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April 9, 2018
Corridors project off to a great start
David Daballen, Head of Field Operations


A community project supported by Save The Elephants to define and protect wildlife and livestock corridors in Northern Kenya, has received its first unofficial ‘blessing’ from a wild collared elephant called Kiir. Kiir is the first elephant wearing a tracking collar to be tracked traversing one of the newly-created corridors linking Samburu and Shaba National Reserves in northern Kenya. Connectivity between these two ...

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