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Judging Wildlife

On the 9th of April 2013, Uhuru Kenyatta became Kenya’s first president to take on poaching in his inaugural address. “My fellow Kenyans,” he said, “Poaching and the destruction of our environment has no future in this country. The responsibility to protect our environment belongs not just to the government but to each and every one of us.”

To make certain the fire of this statement did not die out, Save the Elephants and members of the Kenya Elephant Forum sat down to draft a policy document for the President, to help him tackle the crisis at every level. The document, dubbed “10 ways in 100 days” addressed everything from our diplomatic relations with the Far East to the national justice system, putting more guns and boots on the ground to public engagement in the crisis.

Loud peals of victory rang on the 24th of January when Parliament passed the Wildlife Conservation and Management Bill replacing the old law, an archaic document which has been lying untouched since 1976. Now, poaching can now attract a 20 million shilling fine, or life imprisonment for the offender carrying ivory.

To keep the pressure on, WildifeDirect, in partnership with STE have begun an important baseline study of wildlife crime. The aim is to inform a review of the legislation and judicial processes to deter wildlife criminals thereby protecting an important economic asset and the heritage of Kenya. We will do this by juxtaposing the crimes committed against the penalties given, and those provided for in the Wildlife legislation, opening up various options of fines and jail sentences under different existing laws. The idea is to create a basis for such a review to be conducted in other countries within East Africa, and make sure the penalties doled out fit the crime.

Walking the Talk

Jim Nyamu began his 1500km walk around Kenya for elephants. In Samburu, Save the Elephants mobilized 1000 men women and children to walk with him, and on his way, the First Lady joined into the march. Elephants for Kenya, a coalition of Kenyans shouting out for elephants, STE included, organized Jim’s final bend into Nairobi, where he was cheered on by thousands and marched into the headquarters of the Kenya Wildlife Service by a lively marching band.

Kenyans everywhere are waking up to the magnitude of the crisis, and are now drawing the battle lines in the sand. With one voice, Kenyans are saying “HANDS OFF OUR ELEPHANTS.” The campaign, launched by our partner Dr. Paula Kahumbu of Wildlife Direct, aims to reach every Kenyan through corporate symbols of our heritage. This year Kenya, more than ever before will see how integral elephants are to our heritage when all the elephants we know and love in our favourite Kenyan beer, airline or even our highest currency note vanish, or are pictured as tuskless or dead.

As the fight in the real war zones where elephants are dying grows graver, the coalition of concerned individuals, institutions, NGOs and the government of Kenya is the army that will fight back to end the crisis.

Here continues the story of the struggle for Kenya’s elephants, the story of hope.

Donate

The fate of elephants is in the balance. The record price of ivory has attracted organised crime, rebel militias and even terrorist groups, fuelling a surge of poaching across the continent. Without the outstanding support and generosity of our donors, STE would not be able to continue securing a future for the elephants. We urgently need your support, while there is still time. You can be of vital assistance by donating to either our core funds or to any of our projects.

Spread the Word

The fate of elephants is in the balance. The record price of ivory has attracted organised crime, rebel militias and even terrorist groups, fuelling a surge of poaching across the continent. Without the outstanding support and generosity of our donors, STE would not be able to continue securing a future for the elephants. We urgently need your support, while there is still time. You can be of vital assistance by donating to either our core funds or to any of our projects.

How You Can Help

Over the last years our world-leading conservation efforts have been possible thanks to the dedication and generosity of loyal supporters. To join them you can donate in a number of ways:

save the elephants, elephant, elephants are important, why elephants are important, STE, wildlife conservation, wildlife, elephant tusks, Samburu National Reserve, Kenya, Elephant Crisis Fund, ECF, WCN, World Conservation Network, Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation

Elephants are fast disappearing from the wild. Without urgent, international action they could be gone within a generation. The Elephant Crisis Fund provides rapid, catalytic support for the most effective projects designed to stop the killing, thwart traffickers and end the demand for ivory. 100% of all donations reach the field.

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Save the Elephants is funded almost entirely by private donations. It is only through the generous support of donors that we are able to continue our important elephant conservation work. We rely entirely on funds, grants and donations from around the world, so thank you for helping us to secure a future for these fascinating creatures.

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Our unique brand of conservation education encourages students to become ambassadors of their rich environment. We also give opportunities to friends around the world to help educate young minds and improve the infrastructure of their schools. Sponsor a child & help build a future for wildlife.