Kenya's Third Set of Twin Baby Elephants Spotted in Aberdare National Park
June 21, 2022
Dennis Lubanga, Tuko 



See link for photos.
 
The elephant twins were first sighted on June 6, 2022 night and again on June 7, 2022 lunch time at Ark Lodge waterhole In the company of their mother and other elephants, the animals licked salt from the ground around the waterhole Research shows that elephant twins are rarely encountered in jumbo populations because they form around only 1% of births 
 
 TUKO.co.ke understands that the elephant twins were first sighted on June 6, 2022 night and again on June 7, 2022 lunch time at Ark Lodge waterhole. Jumbos gather at the waterhole to lick salt In the company of their mother and other elephants, the animals licked salt from the ground.
 
The first twins to be sighted was in Amboseli National Park in 2018. The second sighting was in Samburu in January 2022 and the latest in Aberdare National Park in June 2022. According to research, twins are rarely encountered in elephant populations. Kenya's third set of twin baby elephants were spotted in Aberdare National Park. 
 
They in fact form around only 1% of births. This is according to Save the Elephants (STE) founder Iain Douglas-Hamilton. "Often the mothers don't have enough milk to support two calves," STE says. At about 22 months, the African elephant has the longest gestation period of any living mammal and gives birth approximately every four years. Twins are rarely encountered in elephant populations.
 
Elephants in Kenya and other sub-Saharan African countries have increasingly fallen prey to poachers. But Kenya's tourism ministry said in 2020 that elephant numbers in the country had more than doubled thanks to increased anti-poaching efforts, to 34,000 in 2018 from 16,000 in 1989. 
 
Elephants Give Birth in Caves 
TUKO.co.ke previously reported that deep inside Mt Elgon National Park in Western Kenya are the elephant maternity caves where the world’s largest terrestrial mammal gives birth to new ones. Due to the rampant wildlife poaching cases on the Ugandan side, the jumbos consider these caves to be their safest place to bring forth new ones due to guaranteed security, availability of salt licks, and plenty of soft food.
 
There are over five indemnified caves, some partitioned into cubicles where the big mammals protect the young ones from injuries, predicators, and bites by insects such as tsetse flies, bees, safari ants, and others. “The expectant elephants travel all the way from the neighboring Trans Nzoia county and Uganda to the caves where they give birth and bring up the young ones,” Bungoma Tourism, Water, Environment and Natural Resources executive Renson Makheti Wanyonyi told TUKO.co.ke.
 
Mt Elgon, one of the country’s five water towers, is shared by Bungoma and Trans Nzoia counties and extends to neighboring Uganda. Read more: https://www.tuko.co.ke/kenya/459160-kenyas-third-set-twin-baby-elephants-spotted-aberdare-national-park/
 
A visit by TUKO.co.ke to the caves showed that the hidden caves have unique rooms (wards) reserved for the young ones and a zone for the salt licks for the rest of the older elephants.
 

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